Install Theme

(Source: amoowinehouse)

thefurrawn:

“There’s never been a girl who radiated more uninhibited erotic charm than Harriet. No one since that girl.” -Ingmar Bergman

thefurrawn:

“There’s never been a girl who radiated more uninhibited erotic charm than Harriet. No one since that girl.” -Ingmar Bergman

skunkbear:

Close-ups of butterfly wing scales! You should definitely click on these images to get the full detail.

I’ve paired each amazing close-up (by macro photographer Linden Gledhill) with an image of the corresponding butterfly or moth.  The featured lepidoptera* are (in order of appearance):

*Lepidoptera (the scientific order that includes moths and butterflies) means “scaly wing.” The scales get their color not from pigment - but from microscopic structures that manipulate light.

The great science youtube channel “Smarter Every Day” has two videos on this very subject that I highly recommend:

(via npr)

(Source: sophiesnowflake)

this film is dedicated to all those whose sole source of indignation is a trampled on trifle

— Sedmikrasky (daisies) by Vera Chytilová (via the-marble-index)

lapazmerchantstudio:

C.Z. and Max on The Beach, Nan Goldin, 1976.

lapazmerchantstudio:

C.Z. and Max on The Beach, Nan Goldin, 1976.

The menstruating woman is depicted in a state of uncleanliness - yet able to be saved from this unsavoury state by sanitising menstrual products which promise to make her ‘clean’, ‘dry’, ‘deodorised’, and ‘fresh’. These euphemisms - menstruation being referred to as ‘that time of the month’, or the adonishment to ‘stay fresh’ - maintain a degree of separation from the materiality of the menstrual blood, and reinforce the broader social practice of menstruation being only referred to in code - ‘I’ve come on’„ ‘grandma is here’, ‘the little visitor’, or ‘red day’ - which reminds us that it is unspeakable. Depiction of menstrual blood are completely taboo; it remains the great unseen, the shame that must be hidden; so television advertisements show blue ink being poured onto panty-liners, in order to illustrate their absorbency. Red ink would be too close to the real thing that we are desperately trying to avoid, too abruptly dispelling the fantasy of the female body that does not leak.

— Jane M. Usher in Managing the Monstruous Feminine: Regulating the Reproductive Body (via sociophilia)

(via sociolab)

enversendroit:

“Lady Rose Lambton” Robert Mapplethorpe, London, 1976

enversendroit:

“Lady Rose Lambton” Robert Mapplethorpe, London, 1976